Part 4 of writing series: Hope

This part’s about treating writer’s block and being more productive.

Here are the other parts of the series: Part 1, Part 2, Part 3.

What follows is a series of chunks from a paper I wrote for a class.  If you’re my boss or co-worker (or mom), please don’t tell anybody my secret identity  :-) 

The paper is about a topic near and dear to us here on this blog: how to be a more productive writer.  These sections are mostly unedited, but some parts have been snipped out for snappier reading (hahaha!).

Text behind the cut, for lengthiness.  (snerk.)

Read the rest of this entry »

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RBOC

  • DH says:  Detroit has a place called plum market that sells some zingermans products, like coffee cake and candy bars. Detroit may be my new favorite airport.
  • Money back from taxes (yay) goes straight back to the government to pay next year’s estimated taxes (booo).  At least we can send direct…  I think maybe next year when our situation has evened out again I’ll start getting more withheld from my paycheck because it’s less painful than writing big estimated taxes checks and takes less memory.  (Why do we pay estimated taxes?  Mainly because we’re earning money in taxable accounts from dividends that get dripped back into their respective indexes.  So, can’t complain about making money for having money.)
  • Apparently you don’t get a 7 day grace period when you’ve gotten a kindle book as a gift rather than purchasing it yourself (if you, for example, accept and then realize the book is not worth reading or you’ve already read it or whatever).
  • related:  if you’re thinking that a Balogh reissue looks like it might be worth putting on your amazon list because it has a small number of 5 star ratings and no bad ratings, just don’t.
  • I think you also can’t loan kindle books you got as a present rather than purchasing yourself.
  • I woke up with the theme song to the tv show Benson stuck in my head.  And I thought to myself, that was a show about a black man as lieutenant governor.  I wonder why they don’t make more tv shows like that these days and I wonder why so few people talk about that show.  So I looked it up on Google and realized that I had come to the show rather late and that Benson actually started out as the Magic Negro Trope butler and was apparently canceled by the network just before getting a chance to become governor.  So kind of a bittersweet thing.  I just happened to come in at the right age to miss the more racist stuff.  Also, with the google I was able to put Robert Guillaume the musical theater actor together in my mind with the guy who played  Benson.
  • omg.  DH came home with a Kringle from TJ’s imported from Wisconsin and it tasted just like I remembered.  I hadn’t thought about kringles for years.   Sooooo good.  Pecan too, which is my favorite (or maybe cheese or cherry, but pecan seems more standard).  Oh man.
  • DC2 has learned knock-knock jokes.  Hilarity ensues.
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We are not Mr. Money Moustache

We got a link from mothers in medicine the other day.

The link was about how one of our DH’s has an allowance, but it also seemed to contain a misunderstanding of our financial selves.

In case there are widespread misunderstandings, we thought we’d clarify a few things.  We are not the FrugalWoods.  We are not Mr. Money Moustache.  We don’t think you need to spend nothing.  (Nor do we think you need to outsource everything!)

We have a strong belief that you should spend where your utility curve hits your budget constraint in a multi-period model that includes the possibility of negative income shocks.  We understand that each person has his or her own utility curve and budget constraint and probability of positive and negative shocks.  In other words, do what makes you happy in both the short-term and the long-term (so long as it doesn’t hurt other people).

What we do doesn’t mean that’s what you should do.  Our utility curves and budget constraints are probably different than yours.  Which is a good thing or Paradise would sink into the ground from too many people.

Yes, for our sins, we are doing just fine with our finances.  How do we know?  Our use of money aligns with our values.  We’re on track (or getting on track) with retirement savings and so on.  We have contingency plans and emergency plans and so on.  We’re going to be ok in most scenarios (and have, so far, been financially ok when life throws curve balls).

No, we’re not planning on retiring early.  No, we don’t think you need to pay off your mortgage (or even have a house at all!)

We spend a ton of money.  Are we frugal?  Well, if frugality means spending in accordance with our values, yes.  But we’re frugal conditional on making a ton of money.  What we spend these days wouldn’t be frugal for say, us even 5 years ago (even 2-3 years ago), because we didn’t have as much money then.

Yes, we’ve sacrificed in the past which means we can spend more now.  Yes, savings and other kinds of cushions have helped immensely when job plans have changed and we’ve been grateful to our previous selves.  Savings has meant that one member of each of our family units has been able to escape terrible jobs without a new job lined up.  Money really can buy freedom and peace of mind.

Are you doing ok?

Well, we don’t know.  If you’re complaining a lot, then no, you probably aren’t.

Otherwise, that’s something only you can answer.  We recommend checking out financial calculators and maybe the balanced money formula and so on.  Make sure you’re doing the basic good things with your retirement savings (ex. low fee index funds).  That sort of Money 201 stuff.  If you’re not doing ok, then it’s time to rejigger the Money 102 stuff, or possibly even Money 101.

We’ll only judge your spending habits if you’re perpetually bragging about how much you make, complaining about all your debt, bragging about all the luxuries you spend on, and talking about how nice people who make less money than you do are continually buying you necessities because you had an emergency but spent all your money on luxuries.  We find high income people who complain about the consequences of their bad choices and treat other people badly to be irritating.

But otherwise, you buy whatever lattes or fancy vacations or nice cars you can afford (given on-track savings) if that makes you happy.  It’s your money!

And what *we* do is irrelevant to your financial well-being.  Either you’re saving the right amount for your situation and spending on the right things for you or you aren’t.  What we spend or don’t spend isn’t going to affect that.  So even if we were the Frugal Woods, that wouldn’t matter for your bottom line.

Still, we’re not.  And we like it that way.  :)

Do you feel judged by other people’s financial choices?  Also– did you think we were super-frugal low spenders?

Link love

What a week, or rather, this sure has been a week full of Wut?

as in, Wut?  And wait, wut?  (To quote one commenter,”Wait! Wait! Wait! Wait! Wait! As one who believes in UFO’s, a faked Moon landing AND that Obama shot Kennedy (from the Grassy Knoll), I REFUSE to believe that there is more than one woman on this planet who would boink Ted Cruz! EW! “)  Also:  Wha?

insiders to trump

baffling

Obama vs. trump on women

This is some scary excrement.  And here’s some more unconstitutional scary excrement.  People, we gotta start running downstream candidates and VOTING in off-year elections.

so much patriarchy

even more patriarchy :(

the moral of the story

patriarchal equilibrium

VRA still needed today

democrats not as divided as media portrays

Our infrastructure is outdated!

no words

Leave it to Beverly

bet on warren buffet?

financial parenting

Go fund me gave 4K, donors gave the rest.

this is me with forbes now

6 weeks without alcohol

SEP

this is pretty cool

bedrooms

almost makes me wish I had stairs

kittens!

Ask the grumpies: Managing bedtime for an obsessive reader

zenmoo asks:

any ideas on how to manage an obsessive reader? My just 6 year old’s reading ability has exploded over our long holidays. This is great but she gets very caught up new stories to the extent of finding it hard to sleep… I was an obsessive reader at her age too (still am) but it never stopped me sleeping!!

Make sure that your 6 year old has a flashlight that doesn’t get too hot and that hir covers are the kind that won’t melt if say, they have a bare lightbulb touching them. Not that I ever accidentally melted a sleeping bag (much).

You can forbid reading after a certain hour and turn off the light, but one of the great joys of childhood is sneaking to finish a novel late into the night under the covers.  If it interferes with functioning the next day, eventually zie will learn how to regulate it, most of the time anyway.  So long as the next new book isn’t too enthralling.  Fortunately at 6, falling asleep in class is unlikely to result in damage to one’s permanent record.

You also may want to put bedtime a bit earlier so that when you head to bed you can check and remove any lit flashlights or open books from drooling children who have fallen asleep mid-chapter.

Part 3 of Writing Productivity Series (prevalence)

Here are the first parts of the series: Part 1, Part 2Part 4 is next.

What follows is a series of chunks from a paper I wrote for a class.  If you’re my boss or co-worker (or mom), please don’t tell anybody my secret identity  :-) 

The paper is about a topic near and dear to us here on this blog: how to be a more productive writer.  These sections are mostly unedited, but some parts have been snipped out for snappier reading (hahaha!).

 

Text behind the cut.

Read the rest of this entry »

Who are nicole and maggie?

 

Things have changed since we last asked this question.

Dancing!

Goodbye Daniel!

I wonder if this is the same girl and her dog as before.

We’re in Henry’s book and we have 10 followers.

pinterest? (whoa, those aren’t us!)

drug dealers!

peach loving singers or maybe dancers