My stock stopped dripping correctly when it changed providers

My sole dividend stock changed providers from Amstock to Wells Fargo.  This happened while we were in the middle of a move so I put off logging into my new account until I got a letter from them (forwarded from our Paradise address) saying that they’d sent me a letter to my actual address and it had been sent back to them.  Which was odd because I technically have 2 (now three… which is part of the problem) accounts with them (common stock and preferred stock) and I got the other communication just fine and the two accounts are linked.

When I got my quarterly dividend posted to my savings account and it was the same as last quarter’s.  This sent off an alarm bell since my preferred stock is supposed to purchase common stock and the common stock is supposed to deposit quarterly into my savings account.  Thus my dividends increase slightly every quarter.  Except not this quarter.

Instead, it looks like under Wells Fargo that the preferred stock is dripping into an entirely new common-stock account just created by Wells Fargo, and that common stock account is dripping back into itself instead of depositing.  It dripped a whopping $1.80 into itself this past quarter.  Their webpage interface is terrible so there was no indication that this was going to happen from their webpage until after it happened.  A priori it looked like all of the settings had been retained from the previous provider.

I’m not really sure that I ought to be dripping any of this stock or if I should be dripping all of it.  The main reason I have it set up the way it is is so that the dividend doesn’t become worth less over time.  Having the preferred stock (which cannot drip into itself) drip into common stock keeps it above the rate of inflation, in theory.  The main reason I don’t drip all of it is because it is a lot of money to add into a single stock (a utility) that went bankrupt back when I was in graduate school.  The idea is that I take the dividends and then funnel that money into say, retirement.  Which, since money is fungible, sort of happens.

So I emailed them and explained and they emailed back and said they would fix it and consolidate the extra account in the next dividend cycle.  Hopefully that will happen!

So what’s the moral?

I guess, keep an eye on things, especially when providers change.

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Late Link Loves R Us

February challenge continues to go poorly.  It’s not that I don’t want to write, it’s that I just don’t have enough willpower to get everything done before 8am the next day and then I start getting heavily interrupted throughout the day.  There were a couple of days this week I only wrote 15 min.  There were a couple of days I wrote in the morning.  Last Saturday I did no writing.  Basically, I haven’t gained much with this challenge so far and I still have over 300 emails that I need to get through.  I’ll be working all Saturday starting with grading as soon as I finish this link love.  (Writing will come later because I need to discuss some things with a coauthor on a book chapter that finally came back this week.)  Sometime in March I’ll wrap up with why I’ve been getting a C on this challenge (B- if you’re grading generously) even though I’ve done all the previous challenges even ones that were dumb or that I really really hated.

My #2 fear is getting closer to reality.

Republicans in congress are afraid to see their constituents and are refusing to see anybody but big donors during the week that they’re supposed to visit with constituents.  Both of my senators and my congressman are terrified and are refusing to come out.  The closest office to my senator LIED to me about not having the senator’s calendar and then asked for my detailed contact information “to send to DC to get you on the list” because “he doesn’t announce in his newsletter”.  I called the DC office and they told me that they didn’t know why the regional office would say such things since they have no such list and the regional offices all have the senator’s schedule.  Here’s Indivisible on what to do if your MOC has gone missing.  DH is going to one this weekend (it’s in the evening so I’ll be staying home with the kids).

Chaffetz, who should be fired and hopefully will not be re-elected because the people of Utah are basically good people, goes after Sid the Science kid.  He’s also launching yet another investigation of hillary clinton’s emails because I guess he’s hoping that will deflect the fact that he’s not only not @#4ing doing his job but that he’s going to be largely responsible for the @#$23ing mess that Trump is being allowed to do.  There are links to those statements, but I’m too depressed to dig them up.  @#$22 Chaffetz.

Trump’s conflicts of interest ARE SCARY.

Republicans gonna repub.

More white supremacist neo-nazis on campus (aka the f-ing neonazi alt-right)

Why gamergaters become “alt-right” neonazis.

Idaho tried and failed at creating a better plan than the ACA.  That’s because the ACA is the best right-wing plan that there is.  (A better plan would be single-payer, but that would eliminate an entire industry which would do bad things to the economy in the short-run.)

This is frightening and funny at the same time.

MEETUP has joined the #resist movement.  Seriously, MEETUP.  Check them out for things near you!

We are awake and we are angry.

What just happened?  H/T Bogart.

Universities didn’t turn left, the right turned imbecile.  OMG, I have heard so many stories about my congressman in the past week.  No wonder he isn’t coming out to the college town that is a big part of his gerrymandered district.

Sexist course evals.

This is a toolkit from the Immigration Law Center.  More info on protecting immigrants.

US Weekly sick burn.  (Also, excellent inveting advice)

Melinda Gates’ Birth Control pledge.

This is a smart comment and also why I’m pushing my kids so hard in K-12.

At some point in the future I will blog about adventures in trying to find a new flatware set.  But today is not that day.  Here’s a link to another review, though.

Today’s out-of-context internet quote that inspires productivity: “i prefer eating Belgian chocolate to get me in a growth mindset ”  Related:  coffee shop for non-morning people.

This would have been a cool tv series, and I want to read the book!

There are worse hills.

Stay safe out there in the rain.

Pluto’s heart.

“Did you ever wish you could make scatter plots with cat shaped points?  Now you can!”

 

Ask the grumpies: How do you decide on donations?

Another activist economist asks:

What is your donation strategy right now? Are you giving to more places, or more to places you were already supporting? I was torn at the end of last year and just did the latter. Trying to decide what to do for 2017.

#2 says:  Both!

#1 also says both.  I think I must have the warm glow version of donating because I am totally just giving to places as they come on my radar.  I have no strategy at all for this stuff (my only planned giving is to my alma mater and DC1’s former private school).  Something horrible happens, I donate to the relevant agency or agencies, it makes me feel a little better.

I know that’s not optimal for the organizations in question (based on graduate public finance*), but it’s optimal for me!  Plus it’s a strategy shared by a ton of people since whenever I give, the news says that organization has just received record amounts.

Another activist economist replies:

If lots of donors share that behavior, it might become optimal for the organizations (getting small amounts from huge numbers of people)? Also, maybe your strategy (or non-strategy) means you donate more over the course of a year than you would if you explicitly made a budget for donating and only gave to a few places. Which is better for the places getting your money.

I have been holding back so far this year since I’m torn. For instance, a friend of mine started supporting this local organization that gives financial assistance to women who can’t afford abortions. But is it better to give to them or Planned Parenthood or split between the two? I’m leaning toward only PP.

I’ve given to both! Because I cried super hard when my sister told me that she was working with an organization in [City] that provides rides and housing for women seeking abortions and had someone staying in her spare bedroom for 3 days because the woman had taken an 8 hour bus in from [a neighboring state] to get an abortion. So I gave $100 to that organization to make the crying stop. Planned parenthood is where we regularly give whenever one of these things comes up in the news, plus it’s where many of our blog proceeds end up going.

While DH remains employed and with the mortgage gone and our retirement accounts maxed out and DC1 no longer in private school and no firm plans going forward for major expenditures, we can afford to just give money whenever so we don’t really need a strategy (still, this has always been how we’ve donated, it’s just that before it was much smaller amounts in grad school and I’d have to cut back on our grocery expenditures to make up the difference). We should be giving more, but I keep thinking, what if we have to move to Paradise permanently? We don’t have enough money in non-retirement non-529 accounts to buy a house in a decent school district, and renting would still be difficult on just DH’s salary. So mainly it’s the emotions that get me to part with my pocketbook even though we should be giving much more than we do.

Another activist economist replies:

I look forward to reading the responses [from the grumpy nation]!*** I should probably stop thinking about what would be optimal and just give when I feel like it. The reality is that my total giving across the year would likely be higher if I did that. But it is hard to turn off the little voice in my head that asks “if you give that $50 here are you taking it from somewhere else where it would have a bigger marginal impact?”

Yeah, I don’t listen to that little voice. It gets shouted down by the, “Look, do you want to stop crying right now or not?” voice, because I have very little impulse control. And since I don’t have a set budget constraint on charitable giving, there’s more likely to be crowding in** than crowding out of giving.

Plus it probably helps that I wasn’t all that convinced by grad PF’s discussion of optimal charitable giving given that most non-profit’s revealed preferences are to go all out and accept lots of little donations from people like me (and then sell my contact info to related organizations that could crowd out my donations to them…).

Agree about the crowding in (probably true for me too) – I don’t have a fixed budget either, exactly. (Though because I am a procrastinator, during normal times I tend to do all my donations at the end of the year, so then I am thinking about the total amount I want to give for that year.) But there’s a budget in the sense that I have an upper bound even if I don’t know exactly what it is. And that is what that little voice reminds me of. Hmmm….

*Graduate PF, if I’m remembering the lecture correctly, suggests that rational individuals interested in making an actual difference rather than just feeling warm and fuzzy should donate large sums to a small number of charities so other places don’t waste money trying to get more money out of you and you’ll have a bigger impact on that organization and more say in what is done with your money. I am obviously just motivated by warm fuzzies. Plus I’m not sold that that’s a bad thing, as you will see in our discussion.

**”Crowding in” in this context means that giving some money makes it more likely that you’re going to give more later.

*** emphasis added

Grumpy nation, do you have a donation strategy?  Do you have a set amount you give each year, or do you give on a case-by-case basis?  Have you had to make any sacrifices for giving?  What makes  you decide to give?  How do you pick who to give to and how much?

Activism: What is helping me cope

  1. Changing the goal posts.  My focus isn’t on making the world incrementally better or keeping it the same, but limiting the damage that is being done.  Everything I do makes progress towards that goal.  I cannot lose.  And, unlike normal times, there isn’t a chance that I’m making things worse.  It’s all uphill from this perspective.
  2. Not reading the news at all.  I’m paying for news, but I am not looking at headlines.  Instead, I am reading @wandsci and @scalzi and, when I’m feeling up to it, various indivisible twitter accounts or @decaro_nick.  They provide a filter for what’s important and what’s actually going on vs. what’s rumor.
  3. Linking troubling information to actions.  I feel better when I’m doing something about the thing that’s bothering me.  Even if it doesn’t get anywhere, I tried.  I call, I give money, I fax, I send letters.
  4. Talking with other people who are also being active and doing things.  Especially people who are doing even more.  They inspire me.
    1. Keeping abreast of the amazing amount of organization that’s happening.  Groups are meeting with other groups.  They’re coordinating.  People are joining them.  People are starting them.  At midterms it won’t matter that the official democratic party is a disorganized mess because we WILL elect moderate republicans in the primaries and flip districts to democrats where possible.  Indivisible will do that.  Groups with the name Alliance or Warriors etc. will do that.  They’re organized.  They’re strong.  They’re growing.  They’ve got money.  If we’re not fascist yet, things are going to happen.  The newly complacent tea party won’t know what hit them, nor will they particularly care now that there’s no longer a black president.
  5. Asking people who tell me that activism in my red state doesn’t make any difference to shut up.  Because even if I know my senator is never going to vote against a racist bigot because he himself is a racist bigot, my calls and the protests I attend send a message that he can’t go as far as he wants in that direction.  He needs to think twice about doing worse things.  Having second thoughts about doing horrific things at the very least slows them down.  AND I’m not the only person who has suddenly become politically active.  A year ago my voice wouldn’t have mattered, but today I am part of a chorus, and that chorus is growing stronger.  Every week I’ve been calling, my representative’s opinions have changed, and they’ve changed because of people like me calling for the first time because it matters and we know we’re stronger together.
  6. Getting my actions each week from one of the weekly lists we mention in our activism tab.  I’ve been going broad instead of deep.   This way I don’t have to be exposed to the entire world of media out there and can just focus on something someone I trust has already curated (I like Actions for Americans because they have a paragraph and links explaining each issue) and get my voice out there efficiently.
  7. Practice and habit.  Calls are WAY less anxiety-producing now.  I have a habit.   I go through Actions for Americans each week.  Later in the week when I get hit with news, I check out what @decaro_nick or my local indivisible groups say to do (if it’s local) and I do that.  I know which of my senators’ local office numbers have a non-zero chance of working and which ones try to make it more difficult to leave a message.  It’s much more matter of fact now than it was when I first called with my voice shaking.  It’s just part of my weekly routine.  Protest whatever atrocities are on the plate for this week.  So that 4 years from now I won’t have to anymore (hopefully then I’ll start calling to support positive change).

What is helping you cope?

RBO answering First Gen American’s questions about #1’s finances post-mortgage

The next near term unmet savings goal seems to be DC1 and Dc2 college fund. More posts on that would be interesting to me as I also have one about the same age. Although I am about a year behind you on payoff, that is my next savings goal.

We decided to up it to $750/mo/kid, basically splitting the difference between what we’d need for a super pricey school and what we were contributing already.  That also means that is eating $500/mo of the not-paying-the-mortgage-savings we were seeing.

I guess you can also ponder some more about when to get that next car

This is a constant pondering thing.  It was in the shop again for a week because it started doing the squealing thing that it had been doing two years ago, and even though it is a cheap fix (tighten things), it takes them forever to figure it out.  Partly because it only squeals when the engine is cold and it’s cold outside.  Only $70 for that + replacing the windshield wipers (because why not), but also there was a week of us having to deal with only having one car (indeed, they didn’t completely fix the squeal because DH had to drive to the city for a meeting and needed me to have the car to do dropoff).  And since they’ve tightened everything the shocks aren’t being as nice and shock absorbent as they usually are which means my ride is more bumpy.  But each time my car needs fixing, we don’t know if it’s going to be the last repair for a while or not.  If it is, then we’re happy, but if the car has to go in again, it’s a pain.  So I don’t know.  We’re still pondering.  Eventually there will be enough excess in savings that we won’t have to rebuild the emergency fund after buying a Prius or something similar.  (We’re not there yet.)  The other car seems fine for now, and the insurance company of the at-fault driver took care of our costs and our insurance company’s costs.

Do general posts on spending budgets (not the day to day expenses, But those emergency ones). I remember feeling a little overwhelmed when my TV, washer and water heater broke within months of each other, until I realized they were all old and due to be replaced… A lot does get fixed when you have a big emergency fund. You don’t really need to keep such close track of everything.

Yeah, we just have a big emergency fund that could cover a washer and water heater and heck, even a new roof (though maybe not solar panels to go on said roof, which we might do after getting a new roof).  We have two water heaters and I guess they’ll be due to be replaced in a few years– can’t remember if we got the 15 year or the 20 year kind.  (And actually, a few months after we moved into this house, shortly after we finally purchased a washer and dryer, the water heaters needed to be replaced, and our dishwasher broke and we ran through a series of broken microwaves… fortunately we’d had paychecks for a few months at that point.  But it did put off our ability to buy furniture.)

Maybe some posts on where you’d move in retirement. I guess if you earn a lot but don’t have a lot of house, a no state income tax place may be a good place to live. I think I generally prefer paying state income tax as there are limits to what low income folks are required to pay. Paying crazy property taxes with a fixed income in retirement is no fun.

We hope to maximize friends and fun things to do in retirement, so we’ll probably be moving to a high tax state!  Most people will retire in place or move closer to family.  But it is a good idea for some folks to think through the tax and cost of living implications of different geographical areas once they’re no longer tied to a job.

Link love and not doing great at the February challenge

I definitely have not been writing for an hour every morning at 8am.  See, what happened was I had a whole plan all ready … and then I got a major grant*, but they need changes made before they can lock in the money and I really want to get the money locked in ASAP.

Saturday and Sunday I wrote for an hour each sort of in the morning, mostly grant stuff.  Monday I did half an hour.  Tuesday I did half an hour.  Wednesday I did nothing.  Thursday I did an hour.  Friday I did half an hour.  Mostly I did not write first thing in the morning because I was too busy scrambling to get ready for whatever 9:30am appointment I had that day.  I had a lot of meetings (except on Thursday where I only had one!).  Tomorrow I guess I will aim to get that referee report done that I’d planned on doing last weekend.  I still have to read the article and I’m not going to read it tonight.  Maybe Sunday I can try to figure out some actual article writing.

This is the first February challenge I’ve not been keeping up with come heck or high water.  I’m a bit disappointed in myself on that front, but also I’ve been working 10-12 hour days on weekdays (7-5 or 7-7 depending on if I have to pick up a child) and several hours each day on weekends just to keep up with everything, so I’m cutting myself some slack on that front.  Still, my end on the grant thing should be done as of today so I need to get back on track with my original plans.  Wish me luck on that.  (Also, I’ve been keeping my inboxes below 320 messages, but only by deleting around 40/day.  It’s going to be a busy weekend.)

And now for some links!  We tried a little harder for some cheerful non-political ones this week.  It’s a little hard since I’m only reading two twitter feeds and am avoiding the news and #2 keeps sending me horrible articles(!) (technically, well-written articles about horrible things because you know, the US).

Go San Francisco! (part VIII is especially great) (SF is where the appeals court for the 9th circuit is) “Minutes after the ruling was released, President Trump denounced it from his Twitter feed. “See you in court,” he tweeted, in all caps.” (but then he didn’t)

This is one of those horrible articles #2 has been sending.

Zombie apocalypse (#1 notes that there are some pretty strong assumptions in that article)

Fascism

Trump and birth control

I’m not sure I agree with this, but it is food for thought.  I definitely think it’s important to make Neo-Nazis ridiculous again and to not give them a platform.  At the same time, we’ve learned recently that we need to take racist threatening buffoons seriously.

twitter

This is cool

I need a shirt that says “dismal scientist”.  Choose science!  Yay scientists!

#2 is going to the Scientist march in DC!  I’m going to a local one.

let America vote

Where are they going?

Look what is happening in Texas.  In Texas!  Look what is happening in Utah.  In Utah!

If you’re a Democrat in a red state and you’ve spent the last month calling your Senator about [insert evil corrupt cabinet pick here]… definitely read this link.

Also, fight people who tell you activism isn’t worth it.  My colleague who I yelled at for telling me my calls didn’t matter came to my office this week to tell me that maybe they did since the state legislature had tabled one of their awful alt-right bills– after public outcry, they’re not even going to vote on it.

In case you need to measure text readability because your IRB says you have to

persistence postcards

What happened after Huckabee said something homophobic.

general strike feb 17th (I’m not sure how I feel about these since in the US only the privileged can participate, but maybe that’s ok?)

ACLU fundraising frenzy

Does this actually work?

I wore my beta hat today

Happy second blogoversary, Crazy Grad ma!

Four easy and romantic meals to impress your valentine

Love is Love

a podcast so boring it’s meant to help you fall asleep

should parents pay for childrens’ college?

This makes my day better

girlfriend got him a cat  trying to do paperwork

A rich source

tiny hats on cats

three

Note on the videos– this first one here for me is like taking Valium.  Does anybody else get that sense of zen?  DH doesn’t– he feels super trippy, but not like he’s successfully meditated.  I feel like it takes over the part of my brain that’s constantly worrying about the state of the world.

*(yay)

Ask the Grumpies: Do I need to see a financial planner about a 300K inheritance?

A asks:

Tl;dr: Would a windfall that doubled your (age appropriate but not amazing) savings overnight change your savings/investment strategy?

My dad died recently; my mom died a while ago. They were both relatively young and had saved extensively. The bulk of his assets, around 300k, are in various types of IRAs and we plan to roll them over as inherited IRAs and opt for option to take the required minimum distribution over my life expectancy, with the understanding that we can draw down more if we wish.  These assets are currently split nearly evenly between various stocks and bond funds. Additional property based assets also exist but the valuation is less clear – this will likely come to us as cash but at a much later date.

Having been saving appropriately ourselves for retirement, my spouse and I, at 40, have around $350k in various index funds through TIAA CREF and Vanguard – we have in the past several years fully funded our Roths, made our maximum contributions to our own IRAs, and done some “catch up” saving to offset the time my spouse spent in grad school/not working to his full potential.  We have planned/budgeted to continue to do so for the foreseeable future. We also had planned to pay off our house over the next 2-4 years in lieu of investing in bonds.  Our allocations are nearly all in small set of mid-large cap domestic and international index funds.

My question is, given this windfall, which nearly doubles our total savings, should we simply allocate the new funds into our existing allocation? Should we reconsider our savings rate into IRAs? Should we change our financial goals ~ 1) pay off house 2) save for retirement 3) save for other things (kids’ college/travel/etc).  We both like our careers but we also view savings as a means of having choices – to quit a job, to take a leave of absence, or to stay in a job we love that isn’t paying what it should.

We are getting some pressure (from family/from our tax attorney) to find a financial advisor and engage in more expensive actively managed investing.  We aren’t sure about this – should we engage someone for short term advice and pay for it? Should we keep doing what we are doing, which is reading up and figuring it out ourselves? Neither of us works in this area…

Thoughts and advice?

So sorry to hear about your loss.

This is a tough one.  If it were me, 300k isn’t so much that it seems like it needs special financial planning above and beyond what you are already doing.  On the other hand this whole inherited IRA thing could be tricky and have tax consequences that I don’t understand but you sound like you’ve looked into them.

When #2’s husband got a large lump sum from stock options he just added more to the investments he already had using the same strategy as before (also some of that went towards a wedding and moving expenses– they still can’t afford a house where they live).

If it were me I would do 1. Retirement 2. House 3. Other.  You also want as much of that as possible put into vehicles that you can hide from colleges (like retirement and your house) because 300k in cash means you pay 100% tuition etc. while 650k in retirement doesn’t, depending on your income.  So if making those moves is complicated or you don’t know how colleges are going to treat different assets, it might be worth it to talk to a professional.  But that seems more in the realm of your tax person than a financial planner.

Active investing is almost never a good thing and I can’t see 300k being so big that you need it.  It’s not like you’re trying to dodge an inheritance tax at age 40 with less than 700k plus a home.  It’s not a big enough portfolio to really benefit from munis.  So I’m not really sure what active management would add.

On the other hand, when my father dies, my mom already has a firm (apparently a branch of Charles Schwab does this) picked out to forensically untangle all of his investments.  Simplifying them in a way that doesn’t create massive taxes will be the next step.  That’s not active management but it will take a professional in the short term.

So I guess a fee only financial planner might be worth it if this is beyond your tax person’s abilities, but not one who is going to encourage active management.  Instead someone who will help your figure out how to get the right asset mix (which you probably already know), how to avoid excess taxes, and how to maximize financial aid.  So like one or two meetings rather than them taking over your portfolio.

Grumpy Nation, what would you do in A’s situation?