Ask the readers: Help! DH stepped on my oldschool Kindle 3

We didn’t have an ask the grumpies thing queued this week because it has been a crazy insane week, but I have an emergency question!

#1 asks:

DH stepped on my old school Kindle 3– the kind with the side page turners (which I love) and the keyboard.  If money is no object, should I get the Voyage, the Paperwhite, the currently-offered no frills kind, or a used ebay replacement?  (Amazon no longer sells refurbished Kindle 3s and the replacement screens are no longer available for sale anywhere.  We tried all the recommended kindle rebooting things and they erased the stuck picture but it still no longer shows new text.)  If money is an object, what would you get?  Anybody have personal experience with multiple kindles?

I don’t have an answer to this.  The replacement kindle 3 is $35 (including S+H) but sold “as-is” from a 99.4% satisfaction store that has sold 45 of them so far.  The no-frills is $99 without ads.  The Paperwhite is $139.  The Voyage is $219.

Like I said, I really like the side page turners, but I haven’t tried reading with the screen touch, so it might be fine.  I am also skeptical of lighting, but again, haven’t tried it so it might be fine.  I don’t want to see how much time the kindle things I have left– I liked the percentage left options, but I might get used to it.  Basically I’m scared of changing up something I like for something that might irritate me.  But it might be fine!  Is it fine?

Thanks in advance for your help.  I need to keep reading She (free on kindle!– also the origin of the honorific “She who must be obeyed”).  Analysis paralysis is not fun at all.

In which we talk about good books that are great to read

#1:  BTW, *all* of the Survivors’ Club books I’ve read so far have been delightful.  It is a fun fun series.
#2:  I stayed up late reading The Escape.  It was so good!  I was impressed with how Balogh managed to work everything out neatly at the end of The Escape.  Not TOO neat and tidy, but everything turned out in the end!

#1:  right now I’m knee deep in the first one I think the Escape’s been the best so far, but I seriously enjoyed the first two.
#2:  who gets together in the first one?
#1: Hugo, Lord Eames.

#2: Big ups for disability representation. I was impressed.
#1: YES! and she’s obviously done her research on the disabilities, even the mental health ones, which you will see in Flavian Lord Ponsoby’s story
#2:  excellent.  He has the stutter, and doesn’t Hugo have the PTSD? At the end of The Escape is a short story called “The Suitor” about Vincent, too.
#1:  Hugo mostly came to terms with his disability in the 7 years between leaving the war and the book starting. But there’s another mental health story that rings really true in the first book
#2: Excellent.
#1: You know I’m going to have to get the series.
#2:  Phillippa Dean is supposed to go marry Vincent the Viscount, but her heart is set on old flame Julian Crabbe…. CAN TRUE LOVE WIN THE DAY?
#1:  oh man oh man.  We meet Phillippa Dean at the beginning of Vincent’s book and her engagement is mentioned in his book near the end. They’re all so good. Vincent is a good guy.
#2:  well we already know who Vincent marries

#1: Get The Proposal (Book 1) next that’s the one I am thoroughly enjoying.  It also has a lot of commentary on class and culture and some signs of the end of the victorian age. The only thing it’s lacking is more stuff about agriculture.  I mean, it talks about agriculture, but doesn’t get into the weeds like I like.  Heyer does a good job getting into the weeds there.
#2:  if you want long tracts about agriculture you can always read Anna Karenina
#1: ugh, no thank you
#2: so many cabbages
#1:  I wrote a paper in college on Emma in the midst of an agricultural revolution
#2:  you are delightfully nerdy
#1:  My prof was especially impressed with me noticing that the only time Harriet says anything sensible is when she’s talking about agriculture.
#2:  you are one smart cookie.
#1:  That semester I was taking three classes that spent large portions of time on 19th century England.  Only my math class was exempt.
#2:  in college I wrote snarky-ass papers about how much I liked the characters in the V.I. Warshawski Novels by Sara Paretsky.  Especially Lotte, the Austrian Jewish doctor who performed free safe abortions
#1:  I have not read Sara Paretsky
#2:  I dunno that you’d like her. Chicago-based private eye VI Warshawski solves mysteries. If you like detective novels they’re good.
#1:  My mom left a bunch of similar themed books here the last time she stayed.  They haven’t been light enough for me to want to get into them
#2: yeah, they’re probably not fluffy enough for you right now
#1: it must be a sub-genre, mystery novels with abortion doctors in them.  My mom left one series about a historical midwife who solves crimes, I think.  They’re all just a little bit sordid
#2:  oh, hunh.  I didn’t know that.  This character’s main trait isn’t that she does abortions though, it’s that she is a great friend
#1:  mostly they seem to be early 20th century.  Wait, does this have an Australian mini-series based on it?
#2: no
#1: have you seen that?
#2: not that I know of anyway.  What series?
#1: Miss Fisher’s Murder Mysteries I think set in the 1920s.
#2:  no, these ones are later than that
#1:  we saw two episodes and it was really high quality but too sordid for me
#2: these [Paretsky] ones are like in the 1990s
#1:  ah, the ones my mom left are all 1920s-1950s
#2: and I think (IIRC) that the friend is not specifically an abortion doctor, just that she knows how to do abortions and so she does them (in addition to other doctoring).  The VI Warshawski ones are like 1990s. If I’m thinking of the right series, she goes rollerblading.
#2:  hunh! Never heard of those but it does look like lovely production values
#1:  I suspect you will love it.  Australian.  Really interesting because the upper-crust all have British accents, but the normal people have Aussie accents.
#2:  actually I think I have heard of the book series but not read them
#2: I will probably enjoy that, you’re right

#1:  I want to read the stories of some of these other characters too [in the Survivors’ Club].  The glimpses of backstories are so interesting that I’m certain there must be another series that gives them full attention.  I love the way Balogh has created an entire world and we see people in it multiple times.  Even if there are still more young attractive dukes than could ever be possible.  I wonder what book is Lily’s story
#2: mmm delicious dukes
#1: this one has a lovely way of showing the same scene from both the hero and the heroine’s perspectives. Aiee, I just hit the part where the reader is firmly convinced that they’re perfect for each other.  Balogh is CLEVER.

Read the book first or watch the movie first?

While watching old vlogbrothers videos, I found out they have a campaign to “read the book first“, that is you should read the book before watching the movie.

The book is (almost always) better than the movie… I think everyone can agree on that.  It’s an almost universal truth with only enough exceptions that they prove the rule.

Because most people prefer pleasure to increase over time rather than decrease, it makes sense to save the best for last.  Watch the movie.  Then read the book.

What about spoilers?  I’m the kind of person who doesn’t like surprises, so I’m fine with spoilers.  I love wikipedia so much because I can read plot synopses before deciding to watch a show.  If you really love to be surprised, then yeah, you should probably read the book first, though keep in mind that the movie often deviates substantially from the book for cinematic reasons, so you might not be as spoilered as you think you are.

#2 says:  The correct answer is: read the book first and watch the movie never.  The movie is NEVER as good as what’s in my head when I read!  It’s not worth it.

There, solved that for ya.

#1 disagrees.  CASE IN POINT:  The Princess Bride.  YES, the book is better, but the movie is AMAZEBALLS.  Watch the movie first, then cherish the book.  Similarly, Captain Blood.  Delightful movie with Errol Flynn and Olivia DeHaviland.  Even better book (free on kindle!).  Both are worth the experience.  And then there are fantastic adaptations, think Clueless based on Emma.  Same plot, different experiences.

Obviously some movies suck and aren’t worth watching ever even though the book is good (I’m looking at you, Mrs. Frisby and the Rats of Nimh).  But there are a lot of excellent movies adapted from excellent books.  Experience both!

What about you?  Which first?

Recent (YA-heavy) library picks

Tagged by Diane C. Mullen (middle grade/YA): interesting writing style.  Kid from the urban projects does graffiti, learns about art in small-town boonies.

This One Summer (YA graphic novel): written by two cousins.  Two girls weather the ups and downs of summer by the lake: family and friends in turmoil, swimming, horror movies, sleeping late, bonfires on the beach.

The Escape by Mary Balogh (historical romance): in the style of Venetia in that the characters are mature and they fall in love believably over time with minimal drama the old fashioned way, by getting to know each other– but you know, with sex (which is unlike Venetia).  A widow finds love with a disabled war veteran.  Very sweet.  Also read some earlier Balogh and it wasn’t as good (heroines who want/need to be mastered blech), but still entertaining if you can suspend disbelief.

Caffeinated: How Our Daily Habit Helps, Hurts, and Hooks Us By Murray Carpenter (nonfiction):  the book podcasters loved this one.  It will definitely fill you up with “did you know?” facts that you can foist on people at parties.

Midnight Never Come (The Onyx Court, Book 1) by Marie Brennan (fantasy).  The first in a series, but I don’t feel the need to read the rest, although I have read and will read others by her.  I’ve read quite a few takes on the “faeries in Elizabeth’s court” trope and I generally like them; this one more than most.  Just the right amount of politics. I have also read a couple books in Brennan’s “Lady Trent’s memoirs” series that starts with A Natural History of Dragons: A Memoir by Lady Trent, and I’m about halfway through her first novel, Warrior (Doppelganger).  (#2 thought Natural History started out great but then lost steam… she skimmed through much of the second half or so and doesn’t plan to read another in the series.)

Lumberjanes Vol. 1 (YA or adult graphic novel):  First collection of the comic by Noelle Stevenson, Grace Ellis, Brooke Allen.  Not a library pick but rather a thing I now own.  Acclaimed for being awesome!  Smart girls at summer camp, “Friendship to the max,” and strong women role models.

In further long-regency (that’s romance novels set in the long 19th century, even though the regency is only a small part of it) news: #2 found Mrs. Drew Plays Her Hand by Carla Kelly to be ok.  It would have been better without the large amount of drama condensed into the end.  The book didn’t need it and would have been better without it.  #2 does NOT recommend Mary Jo Putney (particularly Never Less than a Lady) as when one is reading regency novels, one does not need or want graphic descriptions of rape and torture (even if the actual rape/torture happened in the past).  UGH.  Putney seems to get some sadistic pleasure about describing it over and over again, each time more graphically.  Unfortunately the amazon one-star reviews didn’t warn me in advance, so I didn’t realize the graphic descriptions were coming and was still feeling warm and fuzzy about Balogh’s emotionally damaged heroes and heroines healing each other, or I would have stopped reading earlier.  As a “spoiler” (because can you really spoil a regency?) in the last chapter BOTH of these books (the Kelly and the Putney) have the heroine magnanimously forgiving the villain whose actions forced them into premature protective (‘cuz men can’t damage other men’s property!) marriage with the hero.  Unnecessary.

Tell us about good books in the comments!  Any kind.

 

Books on teh wimmenz

If you liked Lean In (or thought it didn’t go far enough!), here are some other books you may enjoy:

Why So Slow? The Advancement of Women by Virginia Valian (we <3 Valian’s work, referenced here)

Lifting a Ton of Feathers: A Woman’s Guide to Surviving in the Academic World, by Paula Caplan, who is an awesome writer of things.

Knowing Your Value: Women, Money, and Getting What You’re Worth

Women Don’t Ask. (Ask For It)

Failing At Fairness (#2’s not such a big fan of this, but go ahead and read) (also there’s a sequel out, which neither of us has read yet)

Women of Academe: Outsiders in the Sacred Grove (old but still good)

Claudia Goldin’s Understanding the Gender Gap: An Economic History of American Women

Nice Girls Don’t Get the Corner Office (which #1 is less a fan of — a lot of this advice is outdated and just wrong… it’s one of those advising women to be more like men books based on zero research, even though the research-based norm now is advising men to be more like women!).

I have What Works for Women  on my to-read shelf.

Who’s got more recommendations for us?  Let everyone know in the comments!

Thoughts on Brave New World

In college we had to give a writing sample on a book that changed the way we view the world.  I wrote about Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World.  I failed that writing test in college and had to re-take the test with a different question (so as not to have to take remedial writing!) because I’m fairly sure the person who graded me didn’t like what I got out of it.  I knew what I was supposed to get out of it, but the tired civilized man dystopia/ wild man utopia always seemed false to me and I felt it must have been tacked on because Aldous Huxley had created a world that, though frightening and different than our own, was too perfect.  Huxley had to come up with a way to destroy its merits, and that destruction fell flat in my mind.  1984 is a far more obvious dystopia; Huxley had to work at destroying his utopia.  Instead, I wrote about how I learned to think like an anthropologist from the book , though I didn’t phrase it as being thinking like an anthropologist.  I just talked about how it showed me that culture shapes the way we view our world (using um, culture’s views of sex being a primary cause of rape as my primary example, which I still know to be correct– if there is no shame to sex, it can no longer be used as a weapon).*

I’ve been thinking about Brave New World and how what I got out of it is different than most literary theory about it.  Anyhow, I think I got something different out of Brave New World for two main reasons:  1.  Although none of the true main characters are women (the one main character woman is kind of a cog who exists to reflect the male main characters), women in that utopia world sure have a hell of a lot better life than women in the real world, even if men don’t necessarily and 2.  I’m an alpha and when I read Brave New World life sucked so much as an alpha and if I rebelled against the social order in Brave New World my punishment would have been to go to a true island utopia populated only by other alphas and oh man oh man that was a dream world for middle-school me (one that came true in high school!).

So I looked up feminist criticisms of brave new world on google, and after adding the name “huxley” so as not to get so much stuff about modern sex that just uses the phrase, I came up with a few interesting articles.  Margaret Atwood (who literally wrote the book on feminist dystopia) has an interesting article on how it has stood up after 75 years.   This google book has some neat discussion questions from a feminist perspective.

And I wonder about how our perceptions in our current society shape what we view as utopia and dystopia, and how clear it is that we need more authors willing and able to write from different perspectives.  How much literary theory only makes sense from a middle-class white male viewpoint?  How many messages seem shallow when you’re not the intended audience?  Feminist theory shouldn’t be relegated in its own niche and ignored by everybody who isn’t a feminist theorist.  We could all benefit from a little anthropology in our world-views.

How often do you feel like you’re not the target audience?  Do you feel like that has shaped your world-view for when you are the target?  And what did you get out of reading Brave New World?**

*Despite not finishing the make-up test and freaking out about that, the writing instructor who graded the make-up told me that based on that writing, it didn’t make sense that I had to take the make-up in the first place, which made me feel better.  I got asked to be a writing tutor a year later.  So I’m pretty sure whoever graded me just didn’t like my arguments.  Another reason for me to never go into the humanities.  And yes, my formal writing is much less stream-of-consciousness than my blogging.  I’m a big believer in outlines and topic sentences.

**It’s short!  And not as traumatic as say, The Handmaid’s Tale (to me, anyway).

Angry Robot Army?

I dunno, man, it sounds kinda militaristic.  But yet!  AR Books!  So on-point!

Angry Robot Books publishes an extremely good-ass library of books. They have one of the highest hit-rates for me of books they publish that I read and own.  (#2 not so much.  #2 craves light and fluffy.  #2 does like Matthew Hughes though.  But he’s the only author on their list she is both familiar with and enjoys reading.  There’s no denying that, for example, Lauren Beukes is quality, but bad things happen to people in her books.)

They also publicize in areas that I see, and that helps.  Their ebooks are DRM-free.

The unusual thing for me is that I very rarely pay attention to which publishers are putting out which books.  Authors, yes; publishers, almost never (sometimes if it’s Subterranean Press).

I seem to be squarely in Angry Robot’s target audience, and they seem to be reaching me pretty well.

I like their books but I wish there weren’t an “army”.

Books of theirs that we have liked and/or found interesting and/or have read and/or own:

And more are on my wish-list, too!

There was a brief panic that a 2 of their imprints (which I’ve never heard of) are closing, but not the whole press.  Honestly I didn’t know they HAD imprints until I saw that post.  Their press release said, “The core Angry Robot imprint is robust, however, and we plan to increase our output from 2 books a month, to 3.”

So… yeah?  Keep rockin!

 

Grumpeteers, have you read any Angry Robot books?

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